Project Archive

LCNAU supported Projects

Flourishing in a Second Language
LCNAU members Dr Antonella Strambi and Dr Ann Luzeckyj (Flinders University) and Assoc Prof Antonia Rubino (University of Sydney) obtained OLT funding for: Flourishing in a Second Language (FL2) – a language curriculum for first-year university students which integrates positive psychology, transition pedagogy and Content-and-Language-Integrated Learning (CLIL) principles.

University Languages Portal Australia
LCNAU was part of a team awarded national funding for a new OLT project ‘A national language studies portal for Australian universities’. It makes visible in a single online location all languages taught at all Australian universities, ranging from Indigenous Australian languages to global languages, from semester-long courses to full degree programs, and via a number of delivery methods. This project continues to be supported by LCNAU.

Survey of Honours programs in Languages
Professor Kerry Dunne (University of Wollongong; Vice President, LCNAU) conducted a survey of Honours programs in languages across the tertiary sector. This survey complements the ULPA (University Languages Portal Australia) project and provided some answers about the extent to which languages are maintaining their presence as research disciplines.

Projects funded by LCNAU

LCNAU provided seed funding for five projects in 2012: Research identities in languages and cultures; ARABIA: Language learning through cultural experiences in a virtual world; Language learning in virtual worlds: the role of foreign languages anxiety and technical anxiety; Student pathways in languages education from school to university: attrition and retention; Language students’ pathways: motivation and retention.

Projects by LCNAU members

The Marco Polo Project
The Marco Polo Project is a free online tool to improve China and Chinese language literacy. The website is a collaborative online translation platform, bringing Chinese writing to Western audiences by crowd-sourcing translations. It also provides a place for emerging or amateur translators to practice their skills as part of a community.

“Are you for or against the adaptation of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages to the Australian context?”
Research was conducted by Dr Nadine Normand-Marconnet (Monash University) on the integration of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) into curriculum and assessment in Australian language programs.